Warren wrote, “There is no precedent for an Education Department secretary nominee with your lack of experience in public education,” to DeVos prior to a confirmation hearing.

Student loans are an easy sell for most people. Many articles will try and talk you out of borrowing. The truth is that in most cases that just isn’t possible. It doesn’t matter if you did your homework on whether or not you should take out loans or not, you have them now. College is expensive so you got some federally backed loans to pay for your school and living expenses. However, the hardest part of student loans doesn’t hit until 6 months after you graduate, repayment. You need to have all the details and be well prepared for entering into the repayment phase of your loans.

To start your loan will be in a standard repayment plan to be paid off in ten years. Ten years is a long time but with the average amount in student loans people have is $30,000 your monthly payments can be exceptionally large. What should you do?

Make sure you have all the details. Now that you have your loans already taken out, you need to learn about them if you haven’t already. Know who your lender is, repayment options, and interest rate. Signing into your FSA account and onto NSLDS, National Student Loan Data System, will answer these questions for you and more. After you’ve learned about your loans, look into repayment options are many. They can be confusing but chances are there is one that is right for you.

Lastly, you need to be aware of your options if you can’t afford your loans. If for one reason or another you can’t pay your monthly payment, it’s better to look at the options set in place for that, rather than just ignoring your loans. As obvious as you may think it sounds, many people, however, just ignore their loans and they bite them later by finally defaulting. Don’t let your loans default, instead look into forbearance or deferment to freeze payments on your loans temporarily.