According to the 2017 Yello Collegiate Survey – Undergraduate Expectations, nearly two-thirds of college students expect to make $60,000 a year with an entry level salary.

 

“Understanding today’s college students’ salary expectations, location preferences and preferred benefits helps recruiters build recruiting marketing programs that speak directly to the audience,” said Dan Bartfield, president, and co-founder of Yello.

Yello, a talent acquisition company, announced the availability of the 2017 Collegiate Survey – Undergraduate Expectations. The survey got in touch with over 1700 current college students to learn their post-graduation, professional aspirations, and expectations.

According to the 2017 Yello Collegiate Survey – Undergraduate Expectations, nearly two-thirds of college students expect to make $60,000 a year with an entry level salary. The people surveyed cited education and major should justify the high entry level salary.

“While entry-level salaries may not align with college students’ expectations, it’s important for employers to be transparent about prospective employees’ career paths and long-term salary potential, to demonstrate how the organization rewards hard work,” said Bartfield.

In the survey, college students revealed to have a preference in location. Typically, it is thought that workers want to live close to home or their hometown. The survey showed that college students would often choose to work away from home to work in cities that are industry hubs and would have access to influential leaders they could learn from. College students value the knowledge they can gain from industry experts and moguls which often times means relocating to industry hubs where they’d like to launch their careers, like moving to Silicon Valley if you’re in the tech industry. Surrounding yourself with not only innovative leaders of the industry but with peers who you can compare notes with or compete against that may elevate your work beyond where it has previously been. Undergrads are eager for these kinds of relationships and atmospheres and are willing to move away from family and friends to solidify their spot in a chosen profession.

However, 70% of graduates enter the workforce with student loans, and 83% of employment candidates say student loan benefits would influence where they choose to work. The move may look tempting, but if you’re a business in one of these hubs to attract the best and the brightest, student loan benefits are often a good place to start.